Cookie Consent by Cookie Consent by TermsFeed
 
The Rock Art Network Noel Hidalgo Tan
The Rock Art Network Noel Hidalgo Tan
The Rock Art Network Noel Hidalgo Tan
Noel Hidalgo Tan
Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
28 April 2017

by Noel Hidalgo Tan
Senior Specialist in Archaeology, Southeast Asian Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SEAMEO SPAFA), Thailand

Archaeological studies in Southeast Asia began as part of the colonial experience initially oriented toward studying temple architecture and sculpture. In later, postcolonial times, archaeology has become a source of national pride and revenue through tourism. Against this background, rock art has traditionally been under-researched. In the past decade, there has been a marked increase in site discoveries and research publications from both local and international scholars (see overviews by Scott and Tan 2016; Tan 2014b; Taçon and Tan 2012). Rock art is now known in nearly every country in Southeast Asia; most rock art is thought to be from the Late Holocene to the Neolithic, although there is evidence of rock art from the Pleistocene (Aubert et al. 2014; O’Connor et al. 2010) to the more recent colonial period (Tan and Walker-Vadillo 2015; Mokhtar Saidin and Taçon 2011).

Southeast Asia is a diverse region, and as a result, rock art research and its management varies from country to country. In this paper, I will outline some successful rock art management and communication strategies from Southeast Asia. They are divided into two approaches: traditional strategies involving physical site management and co-opting local beliefs into the protection of sites; and new media strategies utilizing the internet and social media to engage people in caring for and monitoring sites. This latter strategy has potential for future development, particularly in the case for managing sites that are open to tourists.

Traditional Strategies

Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
FIGURE 1
Phu Phra Bat in Udon Thani Province, Thailand. Various signs and tourist trails are designed to direct tourist behavior.
© Noel Hidalgo Tan
Traditional strategies refer to initiatives led by government or an equivalent authority in protecting rock art through the establishment of protected zones and the management of access. Thailand has the most experience in this regard, having the largest number of known rock art sites in mainland Southeast Asia (Tan 2014b), but similar zones are found in Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, and Myanmar (Tan 2010; Bautista 2015; Tan 2015). Many rock art sites have been gazetted under the Fine Arts Department, the government agency overseeing archaeological properties in the country. Additionally, archaeological sites are a major cultural attraction for Thailand’s tourism industry; several archaeological sites, such as Ayutthaya, Sukhothai, and Ban Chiang, are on the UNESCO World Heritage List, and in 2015 the Fine Arts Department nominated Phu Phra Bat, a site that incorporates rock art, to the list (The Nation 2015).

The Phu Phra Bat site (“The Mountain of Buddha’s Footprints”) was established in 1991 as a historical park and is a sandstone ridge located in Udon Thani Province in northeastern Thailand. The site has a number of natural, historical, and cultural features, including magnificent rock formations—many of which have been converted into Buddhist and animist shrines—architectural ruins from two ancient kingdoms, and some one hundred rock art sites. Taken together, Phu Phra Bat represents a sacred landscape that has been used over a long period of time (Tan and Taçon 2014; Tan 2014a; Munier 1998).

Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
FIGURE 2
Khao Chan Ngam in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand, a rock art site protected by a Buddhist shrine.
© Noel Hidalgo Tan
The park is fairly remote (approximately two hours’ drive from Udon Thani city) and all the significant sites are spread out over Phu Phra Bat plateau. As it is impossible to monitor all parts of the site, tourist management is facilitated by the creation of walking trails that steer tourists to a selected number of rock art sites. Signs are installed at all points of interest to provide information and to remind visitors not to touch the rock paintings where they are accessible (fig. 1). By and large, these measures have been successful, as no rock art damage has been reported so far; however, damage to the site is mitigated by the relatively low number of visitors. Most visitors are Thai, who are more inclined to respect the site because of its religious association.

Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
FIGURE 3
Dr. Goh Hsiao Mei of Universiti Sains Malaysia leading one of the weekend public archaeology workshops at the Gua Tambun rock art site in Ipoh, Malaysia.
© Noel Hidalgo Tan
Religion, or more specifically Southeast Asian Buddhism, merged with local animistic beliefs, plays an important role in many rock art landscapes throughout mainland Southeast Asia. The belief in nature spirits, both benevolent and malevolent, affects people in everyday life, and the Buddha is seen as the chief or most powerful of these spirits. The spirits dwell in physical locations such as the house and village but also in the river, forest, and cave. Buddhism also has traditional associations with caves and rock shelters, being used by some monks as retreats for meditation (Lester 1973; Sitthisunthō̜n, Gardner, and Samāt 2006). Unsurprisingly, we see an intersection between sacred sites and rock art in Buddhist Southeast Asia but also an unexpected strategy for protecting the latter.

The Khao Chan Ngam site (“Mountain of the Beautiful Moon”) in Thailand’s Nakhon Ratchasima Province is a large sandstone massif containing rock art scenes of huntergatherer lifestyles. At the same time, the rock shelter houses a Buddhist shrine with numerous Buddha images. A number of other signs and posters outlining the history of the temple and stories of prominent monks are laid along the wall of the shrine.

The shrine effectively protects the rock art by preventing access and interference (fig. 2). Both the archaeological and the religious value of the site are acknowledged. The shrine is part of a larger temple complex that is maintained by the monastic community, while the Fine Arts Department has placed the rock art on the official register of protected sites and provided signs to inform visitors about the site.

Similar coexistence of rock art sites and Buddhist shrines can be found in Myanmar, Cambodia, and Laos (Tan 2014a; Tan and Taçon 2014) and has been observed elsewhere with other religions in India (Peter Skilling, pers. comm. 2017), Kazakhstan (Lymer 2004), and East Timor (O’Connor, Pannell, and Brockwell 2011). When a site becomes a sacred space, the religious activity protects the rock art from physical damage by preventing access to the rock art; however, religious activities at sites tend to be indifferent to the presence of rock art and may modify the actual site itself. In this regard, local custodians of the site play an important role in understanding the significance of the rock art. By educating them about the importance of the rock art, local custodians also become invested in the long-term preservation and protection of these sacred spaces (fig. 3).

New Media Strategies

The protection of a rock art site through association with a sacred space, while fairly common in Southeast Asia, is a regionally specific phenomenon. In addition, protection of the rock art is not the intention of the religious actors at the site but rather a by-product of maintaining a location’s sanctity. For a more direct approach to raising public awareness and protecting sites, the internet and social media present new opportunities for connecting people with sites and experts. A prime example is the ongoing Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project (GTHAP) in Perak, Malaysia.

GTHAP is an initiative developed by the Centre for Global Archaeological Research at Universiti Sains Malaysia. Gua Tambun is a cliffside rock shelter located outside of Ipoh, the capital of the state of Perak in central peninsular Malaysia. Discovered in 1959, a reexamination of the site in 2009 recorded the presence of more than six hundred paintings, making it the largest rock art site in peninsular Malaysia; from associated finds, the site is dated from the Late Holocene to Early Neolithic period (Matthews 1960; Tan and Chia 2012, 2011, 2010; Tan 2010). In response to the new findings from the 2009 campaign and heightened awareness of the management and conservation issues at the site, GTHAP was launched in 2015.

Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
FIGURE 4
Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project community site visits in Perak, Malaysia. Photo: Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project.
© Noel Hidalgo Tan
GTHAP is the first community engagement heritage project in Malaysia and was established to generate opportunities to protect the Gua Tambun rock art site and create longterm collaborations between the local community, NGOs, and heritage professionals (Goh 2016). Funded through crowdsourcing, GTHAP initiatives include training volunteer rangers and organizing a series of weekly public archaeology workshops (fig. 4). The initiative is further supported by a website and social media platforms on Facebook and Instagram that enhance the community dimension of the project by cultivating interested followers.

The researchers at GTHAP identify a gap in the sense of ownership of Gua Tambun between the researchers and the people who live there now (Goh 2016). Through the GTHAP workshops, Saw et al. argue that encouraging public interpretation of the rock art also raises social awareness and ownership of the rock art sites. At the time of writing, the public archaeology workshops at Gua Tambun are undergoing a fourth season, lasting from March to December 2017.

A contributing factor to the success of the Gua Tambun Heritage Awareness Project is the role of social media in spreading the word and connecting people across space; the researchers at Universiti Sains Malaysia are based in Penang, two states away, but through their efforts they have facilitated an understanding of the often inaccessible academic literature and increased local-level appreciation of the site.

Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
FIGURE 5
Social media can promote community engagement with rock art sites. The use of hashtags tracks activities associated with sites and makes them more discoverable.
© Noel Hidalgo Tan
Social media and the internet also provide new opportunities for researchers to monitor sites remotely. The ubiquity of mobile phones and more advanced digital cameras, combined with the popular trend of sharing images through social media, provides some possibilities to utilize tourists as proxy field researchers. Quick searches of rock art sites on social media such as Facebook and Instagram, as well as image-sharing sites like Flickr or stock photography sites like Shutterstock and Alamy can provide potentially useful images for long-term site monitoring, especially when coupled with a community program like the aforementioned GTHAP.

From personal experience, members of the public—often interested tourists—have reached out to me via my personal website (Tan 2007), Academia.edu, and institutional e-mail to ask about rock art sites they have encountered. In one example, an Austrian tourist who visited Laos in the middle of 2016 saw a rock art site in Luang Prabang Province. Through her internet searches, she found my research and contacted me for more information. As it turns out, the site she visited was known but as yet undocumented (Bouxaythip 2011) and her information led directly to a baseline recording of the site (Tan 2016).

The flow of information shared between the public and researchers works both ways. After reading an article I published about the Karimun Inscription, a petroglyph site in the Riau Islands of Indonesia, near Singapore (Tan 2007), a Buddhist monk was inspired to visit the site and contacted me. I later found out through his blog post that he did visit the site with some of his followers, but unfortunately poured water over the rock engravings and attempted to trace over the carvings (Dhammika 2013). While I could not have foreseen the actions of the monk and his followers, the Karimun Inscription episode is a reminder that obscurity is a great protector of rock art sites. On reflection, social media can play an important role in educating visitors at rock art sites on the proper behavior to promote the preservation of sites.

Utilizing Social Media for Site Management

Underlying the two traditional and new media approaches outlined above is not so much the management of the physical site itself but rather the management of people connected to the rock art sites. The key task for the site manager is engagement with the authorities, local custodians, and visitors. In the case of Southeast Asia, traditional, on-the-ground engagement with local religious and community leaders has an important role to play in the long-term protection of sites; moreover, the cooperation of religious custodians is the single most important protection sites can have from physical interference.

The internet and social media have an equally profound potential for managing visitors, particularly with sites that are already open to tourists. Strategies for use, communicating rock art values, and managing sites fall under four broad categories: raising awareness, creating communities, generating calls to action, and site monitoring.

Raising awareness: In the Southeast Asian experience, rock art is generally unknown and hence undervalued. Therefore, social media and the internet play an important part in creating appreciation of undervalued sites and in educating potential visitors on how to visit and appreciate such sites. Caution and judgment must be used, however, in determining if opening a site to public knowledge exposes it to unnecessary risk.

Creating communities: GTHAP is a successful example of mobilizing a local and international community through the creation of a Facebook page and an Instagram account, and developing a follower base around the site. Care should be taken in choosing the right kinds of online community platforms according to the audience patterns. Community members in turn become vested in the long-term welfare of the site, and a channel from which more publicity and awareness are shared. Generating calls to action: With a large enough follower base, social media can be used to mobilize actions such as clean-up activities, fundraising, and organizing community events. Such events should be designed to generate publicity in order to enlarge the existing community.

Site monitoring: For heavily visited sites, social media can be used to monitor rock art and site degradation through photos shared between community members. Most social media outlets offer some way of tracking the number of followers, but hashtags (#s) should also be propagated and monitored to track specific activities and sites (fig. 5). Watermarking images with hashtags and website addresses are also useful methods of spreading important information.

References

Aubert, Maxime, Adam Brumm, Muhammad Ramli, Thomas Sutikna, E. Wahyu Saptomo, Budianto Hakim, Michael J. Morwood, Gerrit D. van den Bergh, Leslie P.J. Kinsley, and Anthony Dosseto. 2014. Pleistocene cave art from Sulawesi, Indonesia. Nature 514 (7521): 223–27.

Bautista, Angel P. 2015. Current status of archaeology in the Philippines. In Advancing Southeast Asian Archaeology 2013: Selected Papers from the First SEAMEO SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology, Chonburi, Thailand 2013, edited by Noel Hidalgo Tan, 207–14. Bangkok: SEAMEO SPAFA Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts.

Bouxaythip, Souliya. 2011. “The Significant Rock Art in the Lao PDR Presented at the Training.” Paper presented at the Training/Workshop on the Introduction to Rock Art Studies in Southeast Asia, SEAMEO SPAFA, Bangkok, Thailand, 2–13 May.

Dhammika, Shravasti. 2013. “The Karimun Inscription.” Dhamma Musings (10 March). http://sdhammika.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-karimun-inscription.html

Goh, Hsiao Mei. 2016. The pitfalls and prospects of community heritage engagement in Malaysian archaeology. In Workshop on the Heritage of Ancient and Urban Sites: Giving Voice to Local Priorities. Singapore: ISEAS.

Lester, Robert C. 1973. Theravada Buddhism in Southeast Asia. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Lymer, Kenneth. 2004. Rags and rock art: The landscapes of holy site pilgrimage in the Republic of Kazakhstan. World Archaeology 36 (1): 158–72.

Matthews, J. M. 1960 A Note on Rock Paintings Recently Discovered Near Ipoh, Perak, Federation of Malaya. Man 60: 1-3.

Mokhtar Saidin, and Paul S. C. Taçon. 2011. The recent rock drawings of the Lenggong Valley, Perak, Malaysia. Antiquity 85 (328): 459–75.

Munier, Christophe. 1998. Sacred Rocks and Buddhist Caves in Thailand. Bangkok: White Lotus. The Nation. 2015. “Phu Phra Bat Park Nominated for Unesco Heritage Site List.” The Nation [Thai Portal] (27 January). http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Phu-Phra-Bat-Park-nominated-for-Unesco-Heritage-Si-30252745.html

O’Connor, Sue, Ken Aplin, Emma St. Pierre, and Yue-xing Feng. 2010. Faces of the ancestors revealed: Discovery and dating of a Pleistocene-age petroglyph in Lene Hara Cave, East Timor. Antiquity 84 (325): 649–65.

O’Connor, Sue, Sandra Pannell, and Sally Brockwell. 2011. Whose culture and heritage for whom? The limits of national public good protected area models in Timor Leste. In Rethinking Cultural Resource Management in Southeast Asia: Preservation, Development, and Neglect, edited by John N. Miksic, Geok Yian Goh, and Sue O’Connor, 39–66. Anthem Southeast Asian Studies.
London: Anthem Press.

Scott, V., and Noel Hidalgo Tan. 2016. Recent rock art studies in Southeast Asia. In Rock Art Studies: News of the World 5, edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie R. Franklin, Matthias Strecker, and E. G. Dėvlet, 163–70. Archaeopress Archaeology. Oxford: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd.

Sitthisunthō̜n, Phindā [Pindar Sidisunthorn], Simon Gardner, and Dīn Samāt [Dean Smart]. 2006. Caves of Northern Thailand. Bangkok: River Books.

Taçon, Paul, and Noel Hidalgo Tan. 2012. Recent rock art research in Southeast Asia and southern China. In Rock Art Studies: News of the World 4, edited by Paul G. Bahn, Natalie R. Franklin, and Matthias Strecker, 207–14. Oxford: Oxbow.

Tan, Noel. 2007. “The Karimun Inscription.” SEAArch: The Southeast Asian Archaeology Newsblog (15 April). http://www.southeastasianarchaeology.com/2007/04/15/indonesia-karimun-inscription/

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2010. Scientific Reinvestigation of the Rock Art at Gua Tambun, Perak. Volume 1: New Research. Master’s thesis, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2014a. Painted Sites, Sacred Sites: An Examination of Religious Syncretism in Southeast Asia through Rock Art Site Usage. PhD diss., Australian National University.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2014b. Rock art research in Southeast Asia: A synthesis. Arts 3 (1): 73–104.
http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0752/3/1/73

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2015. Report on the Newly-Discovered Rock Art Site of Gabarni, Shan State, Myanmar.
Unpublished. SEAMEO SPAFA, Bangkok.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2016. “The Rock Art of the Nam Ou, Luang Prabang, Laos.” https://www.researchgate.net/project/The-Rock-art-of-the-Nam-Ou-Luang-Prabang-Laos

Tan, Noel Hidalgo, and Stephen Chia. 2010. “New” rock art from Gua Tambun, Perak, Malaysia. Rock Art Research 27 (1): 9–18.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo.. 2011. Current research on the rock art at Gua Tambun, Perak, Malaysia. Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association 31: 93–108.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo. 2012. Revisiting the rock art at Gua Tambun, Perak, Malaysia. In Crossing Borders: Selected Papers from the 13th International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists, Volume 1, edited by Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz, Andreas Reinecke, and Dominik Bonatz, 181–98. Singapore: NUS Press.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo, and Paul S. C. Taçon. 2014. Rock art and the sacred landscapes of mainland Southeast Asia. In Rock Art and Sacred Landscapes, edited by Donna L. Gillette, Mavis Greer, Michele Helene Hayward, and William Breen Murray, 67–84. One World Archaeology. New York: Springer.

Tan, Noel Hidalgo, and Veronica Walker-Vadillo. 2015. The curious case of the steamship on the Mekong. Asian Perspectives: Journal of Archeology for Asia & the Pacific 54 (2): 253–73.

Wichakana, M., ed. 1994. `Utthayan prawattisat Phu Phrabat = Phu Phra Bat Historical Park, `Ekkasan Kong Borannakhadi. [Bangkok]: Krom Sinlapakon.

The Rock Art Network
→ Discover more about the Rock Art Network
→ Members and affiliated institutions of the Rock Art Network

Latest Article
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020

Recent Articles
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017

Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
If you have enjoyed visiting this website
please consider adding a link © Bradshaw Foundation
 
 
Rock Art Network
LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation Facebook
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Rock Art Network
LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation Facebook
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store